Nurses and Their Work in Hospitals: Ruled by Embedded Ideologies and Moving Discourses

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dc.contributor.advisor Ryan, Heather
dc.contributor.author Urban, Ann-Marie
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-30T15:13:22Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-30T15:13:22Z
dc.date.issued 2012-03
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10294/3553
dc.description A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education, University of Regina, vi, 235l. en_US
dc.description.abstract Nursing originates from societal beliefs about women‟s roles of self-sacrifice and obedience situated within a history of patriarchal control. Unfortunately, these ideologies continue to influence and shape nurses‟ work in hospitals. Within the literature, several dominant discourses construct hospitals and nurses‟ work in hospitals as chaotic and challenging while nurses are conceptualized as stressed and fatigued. Overcrowding, increasing patient acuity, budget constraint, and chronic understaffing are only some of the issues nurses face in their every day and night work. Because of these problems, nurses are expected to care for patients in the hallways; manage with minimal staffing; and simply absorb the work associated with acutely ill patients. Nurses actively participate and take up these discourses as their work. Patriarchal assumptions and nurses‟ endless compromise and accommodation have resulted in the normalization of hospital problems as just part of nurses‟ work. Prevailing ideologies and institutional discourses make invisible, and taken-for-granted, how this work contributes to sustaining the hospital‟s power. External relations contribute to influencing and organizing nurses and their work. Using institutional ethnography and a poststructuralist perspective; this research relies on my experience, historical research, participant observation and interviews to reveal how institutional discourses have framed nurses‟ work in hospitals and how nurses actively participate in perpetuating and vivifying them. en_US
dc.description.uri A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy *, University of Regina. *, * p. en
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Regina en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nurses--Saskatchewan--Regina
dc.subject.lcsh Nurses--Saskatchewan--Regina--Social conditions
dc.subject.lcsh Nurses--Job stress--Saskatchewan--Regina
dc.subject.lcsh Intensive care nursing--Saskatchewan--Regina
dc.subject.lcsh Hospitals--Saskatchewan--Regina--Sociological aspects
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing--Social aspects--Saskatchewan--Regina
dc.subject.lcsh Nursing--Political aspects--Saskatchewan--Regina
dc.subject.lcsh Sex role in the work environment--Saskatchewan--Regina
dc.title Nurses and Their Work in Hospitals: Ruled by Embedded Ideologies and Moving Discourses en_US
dc.type Thesis en
dc.description.authorstatus Student en
dc.description.peerreview yes en
thesis.degree.name Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en
thesis.degree.discipline Education en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Regina en
thesis.degree.department Faculty of Education en_US
dc.contributor.committeemember Hart, Paul
dc.contributor.committeemember Schick, Carol
dc.contributor.committeemember Riemer, Harold
dc.contributor.externalexaminer Cameron, Brenda L.


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