oURspace

University of Regina Institutional Repository

The mission of the oURspace digital repository is to share and preserve the scholarly, creative, and cultural work produced at the University of Regina.

What are some of the benefits of depositing your works in oURspace?

  • Increased access to your scholarly publications.
  • Content is indexed and discoverable in Google Scholar.
  • Compliance with open access funding requirements.
  • Long term preservation of your work.

Please contact ourspace@uregina.ca if you have questions or want more information about oURspace.






 

Recent Submissions

ItemOpen Access
When Witches were Real: Looking back to the European Witch Hunts
(2023-10-31) Petry, Yvonne
On Tuesday, October 31st, 2023 the Dr. John Archer Library & Archives organized a panel discussion in the Administration Humanities Building where we found out more about spine-tingling horror and casted light upon the history of witchcraft and witch hunts. Panelists: Dr. Noel Chevalier – Professor English (Luther College) Dr. Marcel DeCoste - Professor English (University of Regina) Dr. Yvonne Petry - Professor History, Academic Dean (Luther College) Moderator: Kate Cushon - Subject Librarian English, Theatre and Business Administration (Dr. John Archer Library & Archives)
ItemOpen Access
Modern Horror, Halloween, and the Rise of the Slasher
(2023-10) DeCoste, Marcel
On Tuesday, October 31st, 2023 the Dr. John Archer Library & Archives organized a panel discussion in the Administration Humanities Building where we found out more about spine-tingling horror and casted light upon the history of witchcraft and witch hunts. Panelists: Dr. Noel Chevalier – Professor English (Luther College) Dr. Marcel DeCoste - Professor English (University of Regina) Dr. Yvonne Petry - Professor History, Academic Dean (Luther College) Moderator: Kate Cushon - Subject Librarian English, Theatre and Business Administration (Dr. John Archer Library & Archives)
ItemOpen Access
Prevalence of Current Chronic Pain in Royal Canadian Mounted Police Cadets
(Informa UK Limited, 2024-05-12) Robyn E. Shields; Taylor A. Teckchandani; Katie L. Andrews; Billea Ahlgrim; Danielle M. Caissie; Chet C. Hembroff; Jolan Nisbet; Gordon J. G. Asmundson; Gregory P. Krätzig; R. Nicholas Carleton
Background: Nearly half of active duty Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) officers (i.e., 43%) report experiencing current chronic pain (i.e., pain lasting longer than 3 months). Most RCMP officers (i.e., 91%) who report chronic pain indicate that the pain started after working as RCMP officers. Baseline data on chronic pain prevalence among RCMP cadets has not been available. Aims: The current study was designed to provide cross-sectional estimates of chronic pain prevalence among RCMP cadets starting the Cadet Training Program and to assess for sociodemographic differences among participants. Methods: The RCMP Study uses a longitudinal prospective sequential experimental cohort design to create a clustered randomized trial that engages individual participants for 5.5 years. The current manuscript provides cross- sectional associations between chronic pain prevalence and sociodemographic characteristics. Participants were RCMP cadets (n=770) starting the Cadet Training Program. Location, intensity (i.e., on a 0-10 scale, and days per week experienced), and duration (i.e., number of months) of chronic pain was reported. Differences across sociodemographic characteristics were examined. Results: Few RCMP cadets reported experiencing chronic pain (i.e., 10%); lower back pain was rated as the most severe in terms of intensity and duration, and second most frequently reported in number of days experienced per week. Prevalence of chronic pain was lower among RCMP cadets than RCMP officers. Conclusions: Chronic pain prevalence among active duty RCMP officers may result from or be moderated by operational duties, as well as routine aging. Future researchers could examine ways to mitigate chronic pain development during RCMP officer careers.
ItemOpen Access
Understanding the use of co-design methods for research involving older adults living with HIV: A scoping review protocol
(PLOS, 2024-05-30) Brown, Paige; Singh, Hardeep; Su, Esther; Sirisegaram, Luxey; Munce, Sarah E. P.; Eaton, Andrew D.; Zhabokritsky, Alice; McKinlay, Stuart; Kokorelias, Kristina M.
There is a growing population of adults aged 50 years or older living with HIV, facing unique challenges in care due to age, minority status, and stigma. Co-design methodologies, aligning with patient-centered care, have potential for informing interventions addressing the complex needs of older adults with HIV. Despite challenges, co-design has shown promise in empowering older individuals to actively participate in shaping their care experiences. The scoping review outlined here aims to identify gaps in existing co-design work with this population, emphasizing the importance of inclusivity based on PROGRESS-Plus characteristics for future patient-oriented research. This scoping review protocol is informed by the Joanna Briggs Institute Manual to explore co-design methods in geriatric HIV care literature. The methodology encompasses six stages: 1) developing research questions, 2) creating a search strategy, 3) screening and selecting evidence, 4) data extraction, 5) data analysis using content analysis, and 6) consultation with key stakeholders, including community partners and individuals with lived experience. The review will involve a comprehensive literature search, including peer-reviewed databases and gray literature, to identify relevant studies conducted in the past 20 years. The inclusive criteria focus on empirical data related to co-design methods in HIV care for individuals aged 50 or older, aiming to inform future research and co-design studies in geriatric HIV care. The study will be limited by the exclusion of papers not published or translated to English. Additionally, the varied terminology used to describe co-design across different research may result in the exclusion of articles using alternative terms. The consultation with key stakeholders will be crucial for translating insights into meaningful co-design solutions for virtual HIV care, aiming to provide a comprehensive synthesis that informs evidence-based strategies and addresses disparities in geriatric HIV care.
ItemOpen Access
Riding is Resistance Exhibition Opening Reception June 2019
(University of Regina Library, 2019-06-20) University of Regina Library
Archway Exhibition Space is pleased to present… Riding is Resistance: a Colonialism Skateboards project with students from Scott Collegiate, Treaty 4 Join us for an opening reception on Thursday, June 20, 2019 from 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Archway Exhibition Space, main floor, Dr. John Archer Library, University of Regina.