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dc.contributor.advisorNovotna, Gabriela
dc.contributor.authorPelletier, Kim Agathe Phyliss
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-05T17:53:10Z
dc.date.available2022-08-05T17:53:10Z
dc.date.issued2022-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/15036
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Social Work in Social Work, University of Regina. vii, 113 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractHistorically, competencies have been viewed to primarily capture practice knowledge, core behaviors and skills needed in a wide range of professions. Holistic competence is a multidimensional model that refers to practice-based competencies such as knowledge, skills and abilities but also includes a set of higher-level competencies or meta-competencies such as self-reflection, professional judgement, and self-confidence. The most critical component of meta-competencies is self-reflection. However, there are gaps in research related to holistic competencies used by frontline social work practitioners. The purpose of this descriptive phenomenological approach was to explore the perceptions and attitudes related to self-reflection among social workers who work in mental health and/or addiction fields in Saskatchewan. Interviews with eight social workers with graduate and undergraduate social work degrees who work were conducted to collect data. The findings suggested that social workers valued self-reflection. Eight key themes were identified. First, the study participants reported mixed responses in regards to their overall satisfaction with post-secondary mental health and addiction coursework. Second, all participants reported that it was necessary to purposely set time aside to engage in introspection to strengthen their professional practices as well as to improve their personal life experiences. Third, the study participants identified importance of relationship building between social workers and their clients. Four, pursuing interdisciplinary working alliances was important for social workers participating in the study. Five, it was necessary to have regular clinical supervision within a safe, supportive and trusting relationship. Six, recognizing personal triggers occurred, which challenged and attempted to interfere with their performance abilities. Seven, feeling confident and competent to do their job was additionally important to all social workers. Eight, all social workers considered themselves to be active learners and that seeking continuous learning either through formal or self-directed opportunities was essential for their practice. Barriers that interfered with learning were the lack of training opportunities and insufficient workplace funding. Additionally, other barriers to providing adequate client care was limited community resources, and lack of time to do what was needed for clients. The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has had a negative workplace impact such as increased crises and workloads, including less availability of management to consult. The findings of this study will contribute to filling the gap in research with the use of holistic competencies for social workers in health care and social service sectors. Keywords: social workers, mental health and addictions, transcendental phenomenology, holistic competence, self-reflection, professional and personal developmenten_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.titleProfessional Practice Competencies of Social Workers Employed in Mental Health and Addiction Settings within Saskatchewan: A Phenomenological Inquiryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Social Work (MSW)en_US
thesis.degree.levelMaster'sen
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial Worken_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentFaculty of Social Worken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHunter, Garson
dc.contributor.committeememberHalabuza, Donalda
dc.contributor.externalexaminerAshcroft, Racelle
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-15036
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttps://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/15036/Pelletier_Kim_MSW_Spring_2022.pdf


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