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dc.contributor.advisorSterzuk, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorBelisle, Michelle Wendy
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-30T17:32:06Z
dc.date.available2013-10-30T17:32:06Z
dc.date.issued2012-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/3776
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy In Education, University of Regina. x, 367 l.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing Critical Discourse Analysis and Foucaultian Discourse Analysis, this study applies postcolonial theory to an examination of the discourses of wide-scale reading and writing assessments in Saskatchewan. The study provides answers to three questions examining how the discourses of wide scale assessments in reading and writing construct disadvantages for First Nations and Métis students and simultaneously construct advantages for white settler students. The research data includes the publicly available Assessment for Learning instruments, handbooks, pre-assessment materials, scoring guides and reporting documents for 2005 through 2010, a total of 177 documents. The analysis indicates that there are at least four distinct discourses within the Assessment for Learning materials that are made available for colonial knowledge production and power relations. These discourses can be identified as: linking reading and writing proficiency to becoming a successful and productive member of society; valuing the possession of a particular set of reading and writing strategies as indicative of reading and writing proficiency; espousing a set of common experiences and knowledge among all students at a grade level; and placing white settler English above all other varieties of English as the norm against which student work is measured, reinforcing the dominance of white settler language and culture over all other languages and cultures in Saskatchewan. The discourses of the provincial Assessments for Learning privilege students who come from white settler backgrounds while First Nations and Métis student interests are marginalized as are the interests of other linguistic minorities including Hutterian students and new Canadian students who do not speak the same variety of English as do the local white settler students. There are ways in which each of the four discourses can be troubled and countered and a set of 13 recommendations has been made to disrupt these discourses and put in their place new discourses that do not marginalize minority students. These recommendations include developing a set of shared beliefs around what the goals of education are and how achievement of those goals should be measured at a provincial level; arriving at a set of indicators and measures, acceptable to all stakeholders, to use in reporting on student achievement in reading and writing in Saskatchewan; constructing assessments that connect to curricular content common to all Saskatchewan students; providing student choice in assessment items; the development of a tool or set of tools for examining the discourses of all parts of the assessment materials for colonial knowledge production and power relations; and the review and revision of Saskatchewan curricula with a view to countering and troubling discourses found within the PreK-12 curriculum documents that are similar to those identified in the assessment materials.en_US
dc.description.uriA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy *, University of Regina. *, * p.en
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.subject.lcshEducational tests and measurements--Social aspects--Saskatchewan
dc.subject.lcshTest bias--Saskatchewan
dc.subject.lcshDiscrimination in education--Saskatchewan
dc.subject.lcshEducational equalization--Saskatchewan
dc.subject.lcshIndigenous peoples--Education--Saskatchewan
dc.subject.lcshCritical discourse analysis
dc.titleMaintaining the "Achievement Gap": How the Discourses of Wide-Scale Assessments Marginalize Students and Preserve the Educational Status Quoen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentFaculty of Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCherland, Meredith
dc.contributor.committeememberMcNeil, Barbara
dc.contributor.committeememberSchick, Carol
dc.contributor.committeememberEpiskenew, Jo-Ann
dc.contributor.externalexaminerSt. Denis, Verna
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-3776
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttp://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/3776/Belisle_Michelle_184564245_PhD_Educ_Spring2013.pdf


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