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dc.contributor.advisorJohnston, Susan
dc.contributor.authorBalas, Don Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-22T19:01:52Z
dc.date.available2015-12-22T19:01:52Z
dc.date.issued2015-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/6525
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in English, University of Regina. v, 118 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis studies the transition between Decadent and Modernist poetry in England. The general critical perspectives of the evolution between the fin-de-siècle poetry of the 1890s and the high-Modernist verse of the 1920s were either of too great a separation, or too much a continuation. This study suggests that the Decadents were in fact precursors of the Modernists in their attempts to both stylistically and substantively challenge the dominant modes of poetry, its publication, and its relationship with the reading public in the face of the continued and exponential growth of industrialization, urbanization, commercialization, and other perceived consequences of modernity. For reasons such as the resistance of Victorian morality, the perception of corrupted ideals, belief in influence from the Continent, and the relative disorganization and self-destructive tendencies of its figures, the Decadent poets were largely unable to realize their goal of restructuring poetry and challenging the superiority of modernity. The groundwork they did, however, allowed the Modernist poets who were to become well-known thirty years later to make the revolutionary changes that garnered the Modernist movement the critical and populist importance it had contemporaneously and still has today. Through a mixture of historical and formalist criticism, this thesis attempts to define briefly both Decadent and the Modernist poetry, and trace the transition between the two literary eras. It looks closely at many of the dominant figures in each movement, and links them together within three significant themes that they shared: alienation, disintegration, and reconstruction.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.titleVerses at the Burning of the World: Modernism as a Fulfillment of Decadent Idealsen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)en_US
thesis.degree.levelMaster'sen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentDepartment of Englishen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRuddick, Nicholas
dc.contributor.committeememberDeCoste, Marcel
dc.contributor.externalexaminerOphir, Ella
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-6525
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttp://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/6525/Balas_Don_200204761_MA_ENGL_Fall2015.pdf


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