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dc.contributor.advisorArbuthnott, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorHembroff, Chet Cameron
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-27T19:38:25Z
dc.date.available2016-07-27T19:38:25Z
dc.date.issued2015-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/6838
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in Experimental & Applied Psychology, University of Regina. vii, 78 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractFraming research demonstrates that making simple changes to the description of a task or task strategy can affect behaviour in a number of contexts (Almashat, Ayotte, Edelstein, & Margrett, 2008), but to my knowledge they have not been examined in a law enforcement setting. The present research examines officer decision-making processes during an emergency situation by investigating the influence of framing effects on the use of force. An interactive video-based use-of-force simulation scenario represented the emergency situation and participants were presented with one of three preceding framing manipulations. The experimental conditions emphasized either upholding public safety (i.e., avoiding unnecessary/excessive force) or officer safety (i.e., avoiding personal injury) and a third condition (i.e., control) included only a scenario description. Subsequently, participants were queried about their perceptions of risk regarding the scenario and their self-reported officer and civilian relationships. These results indicate that framing effects influence decisions relating to Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) spray (i.e., pepper spray) usage and the participants’ perceptions of suspect risk. Positive officer relationships were also found to predict early firearm and OC spray deployment. This research has important implications for the language used when training law enforcement officers and briefing officers during emergency calls. If minor variations in wording can bias officers to use more or less force, this may have important implications for law enforcement practices. This research also has important implications regarding officer relationships with fellow officers and civilians. It may be important to manage officer relationships within the workplace as well as in the community to reduce any potential, negative impact on operational duties.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.titleFraming Effects in Officer Use-of- Force Decision Makingen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)en_US
thesis.degree.levelMaster'sen
thesis.degree.disciplineExperimental and Applied Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMacLennan, Richard
dc.contributor.committeememberPrice, Heather
dc.contributor.externalexaminerRuddell, Richard K.
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-6838
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttp://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/6838/Hembroff_Chet_200277718_MA_EAPsyc_Spring2016.pdf


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