Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWright, Kristi D.
dc.contributor.authorGelinas, Bethany Lee
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T21:54:44Z
dc.date.available2017-06-19T21:54:44Z
dc.date.issued2015-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/7652
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Psychology, University of Regina. xi, 309 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractInterventions for adolescents who engage in deliberate self-harm are notoriously challenging and negligibly effective. Self-harming adolescents often keep their behaviours a secret, do not see their self-harm as a problem, and rely heavily on parents and friends for support and assistance in help-seeking. In fact, social support, particularly via friends and family members, has been identified as one of the most crucial components to self-harm recovery. Although parents and friends are vital to help-seeking and recovery, little is known about the lived experience of parents and friends in supporting someone who self-harms. What little is known indicates that parents and friends struggle with self-harm, as they feel uninformed, unsupported, and often overwhelmed. Mental health professionals and programs would do well to capitalize on the existing primary sources of social support; however, a better understanding of their experiences, perceptions, and struggles are required first. The current study transpired through three stages, involving in-depth interviews with: (1) 10 individuals who have recovered from adolescent self-harm, (2) 10 friends of recovered individuals, and (3) 10 parents of recovered individuals. The current study addressed three main objectives: (1) elucidating the perspective and experience of individuals who have recovered from self-harm, particularly in terms of help-seeking, recovery, and their support needs, (2) elucidating the perspective and experience of friend-caregivers, and (3) elucidating the perspective and experience of parent-caregivers. By examining the retrospective perceptions of recovered individuals, we have gained insight into the wants and needs of a sub-population that is often secretive and uncommunicative. The current study reports on recovered individuals’ experiences with parental involvement, friend involvement, help-seeking, recovery, and support needs. In turn, by examining the perspectives of caregivers, we can gain insight into the wants and needs of the social support system that is in the best position to aid and support self-harming individuals. The current study reports on caregivers’ experiences in the caregiving role, actions in the caregiving role, and perceived support needs. The following key messages were reported across participant groups and were derived from recovered individuals’, friend-caregivers’, and parent-caregivers’ lived experiences. First, direct communication about self-harm is essential to the recovery process. Second, viewing self-harm as an attention-seeking behavior is disadvantageous. Third, self-harm has a widespread and longstanding influence for self-harming individuals as well as caregivers. Fourth, supports are desperately needed for both adolescents and their caregivers throughout the recovery process. Fifth, school systems are integral to improving education and awareness about self-harm. Sixth, psychoeducational support groups are believed to hold widespread treatment potential for adolescents as well as caregivers. The knowledge gained can be used to better inform and implement prevention and treatment strategies for self-harming individuals, as well as for caregivers. Gaining a multidimensional perspective on the self-harm dilemma provides a more comprehensive overview of support opportunities and potential clinical innovations. The corroboration and consensus provided across recovered individuals, friend-caregivers, and parent-caregivers helps focus future directions. In sum, by learning from the experiences of individuals who have lived through the process of recovery from self-harm, the current study augments our understanding of the process, and directs future research and clinical interventions.en_US
dc.description.uriA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy *, University of Regina. *, * p.en
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.titleRecovery from Deliberate Self-Harm: Perspectives from Those Who Have Survived and From Those Who Have Helpeden_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineClinical Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarleton, R. Nicholas
dc.contributor.committeememberGenoe, Rebecca
dc.contributor.committeememberKlest, Bridget
dc.contributor.externalexaminerKlonsky, E. David
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-7652
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttp://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/7652/Gelinas_Bethany_Lee_200298830_PhD_CLIN_PSYC_Fall2016.pdf


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record