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dc.contributor.advisorSterzuk, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorBurton, Jennifer Lynn
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T22:27:29Z
dc.date.available2017-06-19T22:27:29Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/7686
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Adult Education, University of Regina. v, 121 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe growth of international students across Canadian universities means classrooms are increasingly linguistically diverse. This change affects the learning and relationships that occur between English language learners and speakers. Grounded in poststructuralist understandings of language and identity and Davies and Harré’s (1990) positioning theory, this thesis explores six South Korean student’s English language experiences in a Canadian university. Through informal conversational exchanges, narrative dialogue journals, and a personal researcher diary, this qualitative study is concerned with student subject positions and identity construction pertaining to language. What emerges from the data is what I term moments of tension which include students’ encounters with ESL labels, native-speaker identity, desire for fluency, English fear, imagined communities, employment in Canada, teacher respect, direct communication, and Korean relations. These moments of tension serve as entry points for exploring similarities and differences across participants’ experiences of being an English speaker. Students accept or reject varying subject positions within discourses that position and construct their identity in particular ways. Students negotiate silence, emotion, and responsibilities of interlocutor burden in intercultural communication—unveiling complex, evolving understandings of identity negotiation, power in communication, and English speaker legitimacy. The findings of this study reveal implications for EAP programs in universities, teacher education, and future theoretical directions in second language education.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.titleBe(come)ing an English Speaker: Positioning of South Korean Students in a Canadian Universityen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Adult Education (MAEd)en_US
thesis.degree.levelMaster'sen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentFaculty of Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHart, Paul
dc.contributor.committeememberMcNinch, James
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-7686
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttp://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/7686/Burton_Jennifer_200221831_MAED_Spring2017.pdf


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