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dc.contributor.advisorGrande, Troni
dc.contributor.advisorPurdham, Medrie
dc.contributor.authorAdair, Debra Fern
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T20:33:27Z
dc.date.available2017-12-06T20:33:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/7872
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Art in Creative Writing and English, University of Regina. viii, 135 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractMy creative thesis, Little Wonders: A Memoir in Four Parts, is a manuscript of literary nonfiction. I reflect on the past with respect to marriage and motherhood in the lives of my grandmother, my mother, myself, as well as on the experiences of my two sons. I explore memories in order to uncover the significance of being able to remember them. This memoir reflects on my decision to make a new life for myself and my sons alone, a conclusion I consider against the life choices of my mother and grandmother, thereby shedding light on the intergenerational transmission of gendered expectations on marriage and on divorce for the women in my family. In exploring this process of negotiating loss and subsequent rebuilding, I examine how creative expression can be both an outlet from and a response to these stresses in our lives and I weigh the question of what is important to keep, leading me towards a consideration of the objects that symbolize and resonate with the past. I have been influenced by memoirists Lorri Neilsen Glenn, Haven Kimmel, and Alice Walker, concerning their explorations of memory, honesty, and seemingly small actions. Memoir theorists have informed my writing: Patricia Hampl, Vladimir Nabokov, Ben Yagoda, and Philip Lopate. These experts have educated me on the nature of creative nonfiction writing: Hampl’s claim that we carry only images of value, so that from revision and reflection—Nabokov’s process of “caress[ing] the detail”— significance and meaning from memory are revealed; Yagoda’s consideration of the imprecision of memory; and Lopate’s instruction to question why it is we want to write about others. In my critical introduction, I engage with work by theorists D. W. Winnicott and Jo Malin. The theoretical understandings of Winnicott’s transitional object are considered, allowing me to explore the power of our objects and their space made internally available to us from these early associations. Malin’s ideas on embedded maternal narratives allow for new subjectivities for the women in my family, myself, and my sons, creating a dialogue within the memoir, validating all of our experiences, born out of their narratives and my own.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.titleLittle Wonders: A Memoir in Four Partsen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)en_US
thesis.degree.levelMaster'sen
thesis.degree.disciplineCreative Writing and Englishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentDepartment of Englishen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBenning, Sheri
dc.contributor.externalexaminerLanghorst, Barbara
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-7872
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttp://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/7872/Adair_Debra_Fern_200287571_MA-CRWR_Fall2017.pdf


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