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dc.contributor.authorNeill, Calum
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-06T17:07:21Z
dc.date.available2018-06-06T17:07:21Z
dc.date.issued2018-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/8326
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology, University of Regina. 33 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractExposure to natural environments is beneficial to both health and mood, but the mechanisms of causation have yet to be examined in depth (Sandifer Sutton-Grier, and Ward, 2015). The current study answers Sandifer et al’s. (2015) call for further research into the dose-response effect of duration on nature exposure. The study replicates and expands on Brooks, Ottley, Arbuthnott, and Sevigny’s (2017) study exploring the mood effects of exposure to natural environments. The current study examined whether the duration of nature exposure influences immediate mood effects. Participants were exposed to the same natural setting for either 5 or 15 minutes and rated their positive and negative moods both before and after the exposure. The results indicated a significant main effect for pre-test/post-test, indicating mood improvement for nature contact. The factor of duration did not influence mood ratings, indicating that very short exposures to nature provide statistically the same amount of improvement as exposures three times as long.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Arts, University of Regina
dc.subjectNature contacten_US
dc.subjectMood regulationen_US
dc.subjectWell-beingen_US
dc.titleDuration of nature contact and mooden_US
dc.typeUndergraduate Honours Thesisen_US
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten_US
dc.description.peerreviewnoen_US


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