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dc.contributor.authorReid, Miranda
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-06T20:11:20Z
dc.date.available2018-06-06T20:11:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/8335
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology, University of Regina. 36 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractAccording to the Canadian Mental Health Association (2006), mental health disorders are the most common health problems affecting children and youth in Canada; meanwhile, only 20% of children diagnosed receive treatment. Mental health symptoms that go untreated are associated with negative developmental outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. For instance, children who display symptoms of hyperactivity have higher rates of depression in adolescence (Weeks et al., 2016). Statistics on mental health in Canadian children indicate a need for not only appropriate treatment but also prevention programs. Physical activity is well established as a determinant of psychological health; thus, it can be a protective factor against the development of mental disorders (e.g., Reid et al., 2015). The YMCA has taken steps to support youth in achieving a lifetime of physical activity, specifically with the introduction of physical literacy courses. In order to ensure program quality and improved wellbeing, evaluation of YMCA programming is necessary. The current study aims to evaluate children’s change in hyperactivity, emotional symptoms, conduct problems, peer relationship problems and pro-social behavior after participating in one of four physical literacy programs offered at the YMCA of Regina. Both parents and children completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (Goodman, 1997) during the first class and last class of the program. We found that parents reported an increase in conduct problems, while children reported a decrease. A decrease in hyperactivity, peer relationship problems and internalizing behavior was noticed by parents, while children identified a decrease in hyperactivity following the physical literacy intervention. There was no effect for emotional symptoms and pro-social behavior. This research will help inform a stable youth mental health prevention curriculum at the YMCA of Regina.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Arts, University of Regina
dc.subjectYMCA of Reginaen_US
dc.subjectChild mental health servicesen_US
dc.subjectLiteracy programs—Reginaen_US
dc.subjectPhysical literacy programsen_US
dc.titleMental health outcomes for children in YMCA of Regina physical literacy programs: a pilot studyen_US
dc.title.alternativeMental health outcomes: a pilot studyen_US
dc.typeUndergraduate Honours Thesisen_US
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten_US
dc.description.peerreviewnoen_US


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