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dc.contributor.advisorNovotna, Gabriela
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Jessica Lena
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-05T18:00:52Z
dc.date.available2018-12-05T18:00:52Z
dc.date.issued2018-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/8518
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Social Work, University of Regina. vi, 107 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, a phenomenological approach was used to understand the lived experience of individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder when accessing non-psychiatric health care services. Healthcare can be accessed upon a variety of levels such as primary care physicians, specialized physicians, or emergency services. For the purpose of this study, all three levels of entry to healthcare were considered and included. Doing so provided a rich description of overall healthcare services accessed and the ways in which this population experienced accessing it. The findings from this study will contribute to the literature available to identify the ways in which people with a major mental illness experience healthcare, choose to access it, factors that impact the experiences, as well as ways in which healthcare practitioners can better support this population in receiving satisfactory care. In using a phenomenological perspective, multiple interviews were conducted with six participants. From the interviews data was transcribed and significant statements were identified. A total of 348 significant statements were identified and then clustered into six common themes and three sub themes. The six significant themes included the experiences of the onset of mental illness, physical health experiences, unsatisfactory experiences, family support, community support, and the relationship with the psychiatrist. From these major themes three sub themes were also identified; reciprocation of support, mutual respect in the relationship between the patient and healthcare professional, and lack of trust for healthcare professionals. Overall the reported findings were mixed with both negative and positive experiences. This study highlighted the importance of a positive patient-psychiatrist relationship and the concept of mutual respect in this relationship. Participants that identified a level of mutual respect in this relationship also reported higher rates of satisfaction of care in both physical and ii mental health services. Individuals lacking mutual respect reported decreased satisfaction of care and a reluctance to seek future healthcare interventions. The importance of perceived family support was a major theme throughout this study. Participants each accessed family support at different levels, however it remained important to have a support network available to discuss health concerns with or decrease feelings of loneliness. In identifying the available family support, it became very apparent that the ability to reciprocate that support was equally as important. Similarly, the reciprocation of support can be offered at a variety of levels; big or small gestures. Reciprocation is also extended beyond the family unit and can be delivered in a peer-to-peer relationship. Reciprocation of support has also been shown to promote recovery in mental illness. Overall the findings highlight the experiences of this population in accessing non-psychiatric healthcare services as well the importance in the relationship with family and mental health practitioners. These findings will contribute to the literature already available and can also help guide mental health professionals in improving the services provided to this population to increase their positive health outcomes and promote recovery in mental illness.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.titleThe Experiences of People with Schizophrenia or Shizoaffective Disorder in Accessing Non-Psychiatric Health Careen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Social Work (MSW)en_US
thesis.degree.levelMaster'sen
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial Worken_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentFaculty of Social Worken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDurst, Douglas
dc.contributor.committeememberFletcher, Kara
dc.contributor.externalexaminerAshcroft, Rachelle
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-8518
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttps://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/8518/Richardson_Jessica_MSW_Fall2018.pdf


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