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dc.contributor.advisorHadjistavropoulos, Heather
dc.contributor.authorPeynenburg, Vanessa Angelica
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-18T17:28:00Z
dc.date.available2019-11-18T17:28:00Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10294/9008
dc.descriptionA Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology, University of Regina. vi, 122 p.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Post-secondary students experience elevated rates of mental health concerns, including anxiety and depression. These mental health concerns often contribute to the stress experienced by students, and interfere with social and academic functioning. Most colleges and universities have some form of mental health support for students, often in the form of campus counselling centers. However, these services often offer a limited number of sessions per student and are reported to have difficulties meeting the mental health demands of students. Students face several barriers when seeking psychological help, including stigma, lack of time, financial constraints, and perceptions that their mental health concern will resolve on its own or does not warrant psychotherapy. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) is an effective alternative to face-to-face therapy that addresses these barriers in adult populations with some evidence showing ICBT can also be effective with students. The use of ICBT, however, is not yet readily available to students in Canada. More research is needed on student perceptions and preferences for ICBT in order to assist with future attempts to implement ICBT to address the gap between students’ needs and service utilization. Objectives: The present study aimed to explore post-secondary students’ perceptions of ICBT and to identify demographic and clinical variables that predict their ratings of the acceptability and credibility of ICBT. A further objective of this study was to identify student preferences for the content of an ICBT course, as well as their preferred method and frequency of contact with a therapist. Method: Canadian post-secondary students (N = 314) were recruited using Qualtrics, an online survey platform. They completed a battery of questionnaires, including measures of their demographics, depression, anxiety, alcohol and drug use, and medical service utilization. Students also rated the acceptability and credibility of ICBT, face-to-face therapy, and the use of medication as treatments for mental health concerns. Students were provided with a list of possible content for an ICBT course, and different options for the method (e.g., email, telephone, face-to-face) and frequency (e.g., daily, weekly) of contact with a therapist. They were asked to rate how helpful they perceive each of the above options to be in an ICBT course. Analysis and results: Students perceived face-to-face CBT, medication, and ICBT as moderately acceptable and credible treatments for anxiety and depression. ICBT was rated as the least preferable of the treatment options, but was more preferable when face-to-face services could not be received immediately. Less severe depression severity and female gender were identified as predictors of higher acceptability rates of ICBT. Students who expressed more willingness to seek help for mental health concerns viewed ICBT as more credible than those who were less willing to seek help. Participants identified several advantages of ICBT, including convenience, accessibility, and general personal benefits. Disadvantages included the perception that ICBT is too impersonal, has a lack of accountability, and is too time-consuming. Potential implications: Findings from this research study will help inform implementation efforts and future trials of ICBT for postsecondary students with anxiety and depression.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFaculty of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Reginaen_US
dc.titlePerceptions Of and Preference For Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Among Post-Secondary Studentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.authorstatusStudenten
dc.description.peerreviewyesen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts (MA)en_US
thesis.degree.levelMaster'sen
thesis.degree.disciplineClinical Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Reginaen
thesis.degree.departmentDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOriet, Christopher
dc.contributor.committeememberKlest, Bridget
dc.contributor.externalexaminerFrazier, Patricia
dc.identifier.tcnumberTC-SRU-9008
dc.identifier.thesisurlhttps://ourspace.uregina.ca/bitstream/handle/10294/9008/Peynenburg_Vanessa_MA_ClinPSYC_Fall2019.pdf


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